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Canadian Eskimo Dog

Strong Turkish flock guard adapted to outdoor life in all weathers


BREED ORIGINS

Although they are still called ‘Canadian Eskimo Dogs’ this site acknowledges that the respectful name for this dog is ‘Canadian Inuit Dog’. Unfortunately the various kennel clubs have not yet caught up with this, read more about this – HERE

A dog of the Canadian Arctic, the Canadian Eskimo Dog is called ‘Qimmiq’ by the Inuit. The breed proved popular with Arctic explorers and earned a reputation as a sled dog that could pull the heaviest loads over the greatest distances on the least amount of food. The introduction of the faster Siberian Husky into Canada for the popular sport of sledding led to a decline in the popularity of the Canadian Eskimo Dog. As snowmobiles gained favour, the number of Eskimo Dogs declined dramatically. In the 1970’s, a project headed by William Carpenter and funded by The Canadian Kennel Club, the Canada Council and private individuals saved the breed from extinction.

Read more about the history of this breed – HERE

OTHER NAMES – Canadian Inuit Dog, Qimmiq


LIVING WITH THIS BREED

These dogs have long been associated with humans and are therefore very affectionate and gentle pets. They are responsive dogs who will love to please their owners but can be noisy and vocal at times. This breed is alert and makes a good watchdog, as they are also brave and loyal. Their high intelligence level also makes them easy to train. They are playful and energetic around children and well suited to a home with kids. They are also very pack oriented and get along well with other dogs that respect their place in the pack. This dog can be aggressive towards other dogs who are not part of their pack, and may get into fights. Other pets should be kept away as well, since these dogs will consider smaller animals as prey. They can also be a destructive breed which may lead to chewing and other unwanted behaviours. It is very important that these big dogs are given plenty of daily exercise.


BREED INFORMATION

This information is taken from kennel clubs and other reliable sources

COUNTRY OF ORIGINCanada
PURPOSE BRED FORSled pulling, Companion
OVERALL SIZEMedium
TEMPERAMENTLoyal, Gentle, Affectionate
EXERCISE NEEDEDMore than 2 hours per day
HEIGHT – MALE58-70 cm / 23-27½ in (to shoulder)
HEIGHT – FEMALE50-60 cm / 19½-23½ in (to shoulder)
COAT TYPEShort, thick, double coat
GROOMING NEEDSOnce a week
RARE BREEDYes
LIFE EXPECTANCY10-15 years

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Traditionally they were cared for by the women, and were, therefore, experienced and gentle around children. This trait remains today with proper socialisation and care. 
  • These dogs are suited for the cold climate of the Arctic, and do not do very well in the heat.
  • Years ago, the Inuits would use the frozen urine of the Canadian Eskimo Dog as an ingredient in medicine, and their fur was also very valuable.
  • During famines, the Inuits would sometimes use the dogs as food.
  • Training the breed for various dog sports such as agility, carting, mushing, or skijoring is recommended to provide them with an adequate outlet for their energy.

LINKS TO KENNEL CLUBS

Click the buttons below for more information about this breed


PHOTO GALLERY

Click on any image to view these pictures larger and in a slideshow.


VIDEOS

Enjoy this video about Canadian Eskimo Dog, you can view the entire playlist of videos about this breed on our YouTube Channel by clicking the button below:


WEBSITES ABOUT CANADIAN ESKIMO DOG

Here’s some websites specifically dedicated to this breed, click to view them. I am not affiliated with any of these sites, they’re just here for further information. Please note I will not advertise breeders on this site and as many websites dedicated to a specific breed are run by breeders, sometimes there’s fewer sites listed here.

Thanks for reading!

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